Health

Updated: 26 Cute Made-In-Canada Face Masks

Keep yourself and others safe with cloth options you won't mind wearing every day.

As businesses and workplaces slowly begin to reopen across the country, having a stash of non-medical face masks is essential to keep yourself and others safe when social distancing is not possible, most notably when shopping or using public transport. Wearing a cloth mask can help reduce the spread of infectious respiratory droplets to others, which is especially important as evidence suggests that some people may be asymptomatic carriers of the virus.

The current recommendation from the Public Health Agency of Canada is to opt for a mask made from two layers of tightly-woven fabric like cotton or linen (which should be washed in hot water and air-dried after each use), while the World Health Organization now recommends masks made from three layers of fabric and advises people over 60 or those with health issues to wear medical-grade masks. For added protection against tiny droplets, many masks come with a slot to insert your own filter, which can be made from household items like coffee filters or paper towels.

While non-medical face masks are obviously not a fashion accessory, it’s worth making or purchasing a few comfortable, breathable options you won’t mind wearing. Here, we’ve rounded up a few of our favourite locally-made options from Canadian brands, many of which donate a portion of their proceeds back to their communities.

The Wild Woven Collection

Toronto-based Wild Woven Collection makes face masks from natural textiles dyed with botanicals (like avocado pits) to create trendy tie-dye effects. Each mask features a unique design and comes with your choice of elastics that loop around the ears or the head.

$28, shopwildwoven.com.

Vol Privé

Known for its stylish travel accessories, Montreal-based brand Vol Privé now offers a selection of double-layer non-medical face masks lined with a fabric that boasts antimicrobial properties.

$27, volprive.ca.

Noize

Canadian outerwear brand Noize offers eye-catching masks in an array of bright colours and animal prints. Their snug fit and silky smooth fabric makes them perfect for all-day wear.

$20, noizeoriginal.ca.

Diana Brooks Bridal

Embellished with lace and 3D flowers, these cotton masks by bridal designer Diana Brooks make a statement. For every mask sold, the brand donates $5 to Red Door Shelter.

$20, dianabrooksbridal.com.

Zenchies

Pleated masks in muted neutrals, pastels and leopard print pair perfectly with this Canadian brand’s scrunchies. Ten percent of all proceeds goes to the CancerCare Manitoba Foundation.

$23 each, zenchies.com.

Drake General Store

Toronto-based boutique Drake General Store makes its sleek double-layer offerings from upcycled locally knit jersey. For every mask sold, the brand donates one to families in need.

$25, drakegeneralstore.ca.

Anne Mulaire

Winnipeg design label Anne Mulaire offers a selection of limited edition masks in a variety of bold prints, complete with adjustable elastics and filter slots. The brand also donates masks to community organizations and health care facilities.

$18, annemulaire.ca.

Meemoza

Graphic patterns lend these cotton masks a playful touch, while a wire ensures the perfect fit no matter where your day takes you.

$20, meemoza.ca.

aMask by Freed & Freed

Soft and comfortable, Freed & Freed’s masks come with adjustable fabric straps for a custom-like fit.

$16, freedandfreed.com.

Honubelle

This Calgary-based swimwear label’s face masks feature pleats and a nose wire for a flexible fit.

$18, honubelle.com.

Joseph Tassoni 

If you’re all about matching sets, designer Joseph Tassoni has you covered with breathable masks and hand coverings in vivid colours, ranging from pastel to neon. $5 from each purchase of a pack of 3 masks is donated to support frontline workers at the Joseph Brant Hospital.

$40 for 3, josephtassoni.com.

Confetti Mill

Made from three layers of tightly woven linen, this non-medical face mask from Montreal-based company Confetti Mill comes with a filter pocket and adjustable cords. It’s available in an array of stylish hues, and you can also customize the colour of the cord. For each mask sold, the brand will give $1 to CAP Saint-Barnabé, a charitable organization that helps vulnerable communities in Montreal.

$25, confettimill.com.

Ellie Mae

Known for its playful, feminine designs, Toronto fashion label Ellie Mae now makes face masks from repurposed cotton fabric in an assortment of fun colours and patterns—including blingy sequins. Proceeds from sales help support Feed the Frontlines TO, and a portion of the Liberty of London floral mask sales are donated to Black Health Alliance.

$25, elliemaestudios.com.

Freon Collective

Available in a wide range of bold patterns, these breathable two-layer cotton masks are handmade in Toronto by Nancy Mac, the designer behind zero-waste beauty brand Freon Collective. They come in both adult and kid sizes, and feature filter pockets and adjustable elastic ear straps.

$15, etsy.com.

Frank and Oak

Montreal-based Frank and Oak put its unique minimalist spin on cotton face masks, and they sold out instantly. But don’t worry—you can add your name to the waitlist. All proceeds go to Moisson Montréal, a food bank dedicated to redistributing food donations to community organizations.

$24 for 2, frankandoak.com.

IZ Adaptive

Lightweight and breathable, the double-layer denim-look face masks from Toronto-based clothing brand IZ Adaptive—a pioneer in adaptive and accessible clothing—are available in adult and kid sizes, with elastics that go around the ears or behind the head. For every mask sold, 20 percent of the proceeds go to the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, an organization dedicated to spinal cord injury research.

$15, izadaptive.com.

Thief & Bandit

The face masks from Halifax’s Thief & Bandit are made from two layers of handprinted cotton fabric (including a filter pouch), and they’re just as bold and stylish as the garments the brand is known for. From florals to celestial patterns, there are plenty of designs to choose from, but we’re partial to this colourful cheetah print.

$34, thiefandbandit.com.

Kaela Kay

Produced in Toronto using the label’s trademark printed cotton fabrics, Kaela Kay offers face masks that comfortably mold to the contours of your face and include a filter slot.

$24, kaelakay.com.

Encircled 

Made in Encircled’s Toronto studio, these sleek organic cotton face masks include a filter pocket and are sold in packs of three or five, so you’ll always have a clean mask at hand. At checkout, you can also choose to donate a pack to the frontline workers at the St. James Town Service Providers’ Network.

$52 for 5, encircled.ca.

UNTTLD

Montreal fashion label UNTTLD makes high-fashion face masks with filter pockets and adjustable nose wires from delicate pleated cotton and lace lining. A portion of the proceeds is donated to The Patricia Mackenzie Pavilion, a facility that provides a safe place to stay for all women in need.

$50, atelierunttld.com.

Roots

Roots is using its Toronto factory to manufacture non-medical masks—featuring printed trimmings and filter pockets—in its signature salt & pepper cotton blend. The iconic Canadian brand is also donating a portion of the proceeds from each mask to The Frontline Fund.

$22, roots.com.

Bien Aller

Founded in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Bien Aller offers cotton face masks that are handmade in Montreal and available in three sizes, as well as options made in South Korea that come with washable filters.

$14, bienaller.com.

MOJi

In collaboration with Canadian start-up Sprout Collection, Toronto-based MOJi offers face masks in a wide variety of patterns. The double-layer masks come in three sizes, contain a filter pouch and are reversible, so you can change things up daily. A portion of all proceeds go to local charitable organizations.

$20, mojimask.ca.

Terre-Neuve

Handmade in Newfoundland, Terre-Neuve’s cotton masks come in four sizes and an array of nature-inspired patterns. For every mask sold, $1 goes to The Gathering Place, a local community health centre in St. John’s.

$12, terreneuvesupply.com.

Lennard Taylor

Winnipeg fashion label Lennard Taylor’s soft cotton face masks feature a filter pocket and a removable metal wire that allows for a snug fit over the bridge of the nose. A portion of the proceeds go to charitable organizations; so far the brand has supported the Ronald McDonald House, Siloam Mission, Winnipeg Harvest and Willow Place.

$20, lennardtaylor.com.

Arraei x Bohème Goods

Vancouver-based brands Arraei and Bohème Goods have teamed up to create soft, breathable double-layer face masks out of cotton and hemp waste fabric. The masks come in nine colours and three sizes, and for each mask order, one is donated to a local organization.

$14, arraeicollective.com.