Health

How eating greens can increase your protein intake

I think it’s fair to say that we could all stand to get more green vegetables in our diets. These veggies are chock full of vitamins and nutrients, ranging from iron and folate to vitamins C and A.

Perseusbooks.com

I think it’s fair to say that we could all stand to get more green vegetables in our diets. These veggies are chock full of vitamins and nutrients, ranging from iron and folate to vitamins C and A. They’re also often a great source of fibre, which most North Americans just don’t get enough of. And they’re in season for many months of the year — there’s probably always a fresh green option available where you live.

Eat Greens, by Barbara Scott-Goodman and Liz Trovato, covers a wide range of these veggies, from more commonly consumed options like asparagus and celery to more exotic picks like okra and escarole. The book gives an intro to each veggie, including nutritional info, and gives several recipes for each one, highlighting the versatility of these vegetables. The dishes cover all sorts of meals, from salads and soups to stir-fries and dishes that include meat. It’s all proof that every diet can get some more greens into it, somehow, no matter how you like to eat.

Some people may not realize it, but green vegetables can also be a source of protein. With info from Eat Greens, here are some veggie options that can boost your protein intake:

  • Broccoli rabe (one bunch cooked): 16.7 grams protein
  • Cabbage (one head cooked): 16 grams protein
  • Peas (one cup boiled): 8.6 grams protein
  • Broccoli (one large stalk boiled): 6.7 grams protein
  • Bell peppers (one cup boiled): 5.3 grams protein
  • Collard greens (one cup boiled): 4 grams protein
  • Beet greens (one cup boiled): 3.7 grams protein
  • Artichoke (one medium boiled): 3.5 grams protein

Check out a recipe for broccoli, leek and apple soup from Eat Greens.