Recipes

The lowdown on self-raising flour

I have a lot of British recipes that require self-raising flour. Can you tell me how I can convert all-purpose flour into self-raising flour?

Best brownies
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What is the secret to moist brownies, and what type of chocolate works best?

Start with a brownie recipe that calls for lots of sugar. Sugar-rich brownies get that crispy, almost flaky crust and moist chewy inside. To avoid tough brownies, don’t over-mix when stirring the flour into the batter. I suggest mixing by hand instead of using an electric mixer.

The final key to moist brownies: don’t over-bake! When fully cooked, the edges should puff and pull away from the edges of the pan, and the centre should feel soft when lightly touched. To check, insert a cake tester or toothpick into the centre – it shouldn’t come out clean like a cake, but should have fudgy crumbs sticking to it.

Baker’s chocolate is perfectly fine for baking – in fact, that’s what we use in the Chatelaine Test Kitchen ndash; but there are many other varieties available. At home, I like to use Callebaut, Ghirardelli, Valrhona or Lindt if I’m making an extra-special chocolate dessert. Inspired? Try our Ultimate fudge brownies.

Freezing egg whites
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Can I freeze egg whites?

Uncooked egg whites freeze well and are great to have on hand for baked goods or low-cholesterol omelettes. Use a clean ice cube tray to freeze individual whites, then transfer them to a plastic bag or container with a tight-fitting lid. According to the Canadian Egg Marketing Agency, frozen egg whites will last up to four months. To use, just defrost in the refrigerator overnight (but don’t refreeze once egg whites have thawed). Use your egg whites to whip up our Baked Alaska.

Kosher salt 101
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I notice that most chefs use kosher salt. What is the difference between this and regular table salt, and where can you purchase it?

Kosher salt is coarse-grained salt mined from underground mineral salt mines. Table salt, on the other hand, is made by driving water into a salt deposit in a mine and is fortified with iodine. Additives keep table salt free-flowing and prevent clumping, but many chefs prefer to use kosher salt because of its rougher texture and taste. The large flakes stick more readily to food and melt easily into dishes. Since it’s less dense, I think it has a pure clean taste without being too “salty.”
If you are substituting kosher salt for table salt, a good rule of thumb is to use about twice as much – so, 1/2 tsp (2 mL) table salt is equal to 1 tsp (5 mL) kosher salt. You’ll find kosher salt at most grocery stores and specialty food shops.

The lowdown on self-raising flour
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· Share your cooking tips and tricks in our Food & recipes forum

I have a lot of British recipes that require self-raising flour. Can you tell me how I can convert all-purpose flour into self-raising flour?

The only difference between self-raising and all-purpose flour is that the self-raising variety already has salt and a leavening agent – baking powder – added to it. To enjoy your favourite British recipes with Canadian flour, just add 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) baking powder and 1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt for every cup (250 mL) of flour used.

The lowdown on self-raising flour
Related articles
Helpful tools
Community
· Share your cooking tips and tricks in our Food & recipes forum

I have a lot of British recipes that require self-raising flour. Can you tell me how I can convert all-purpose flour into self-raising flour?

The only difference between self-raising and all-purpose flour is that the self-raising variety already has salt and a leavening agent – baking powder – added to it. To enjoy your favourite British recipes with Canadian flour, just add 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) baking powder and 1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt for every cup (250 mL) of flour used.

The lowdown on self-raising flour
Related articles
Helpful tools
Community
· Share your cooking tips and tricks in our Food & recipes forum

I have a lot of British recipes that require self-raising flour. Can you tell me how I can convert all-purpose flour into self-raising flour?

The only difference between self-raising and all-purpose flour is that the self-raising variety already has salt and a leavening agent – baking powder – added to it. To enjoy your favourite British recipes with Canadian flour, just add 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) baking powder and 1/2 tsp (2 mL) salt for every cup (250 mL) of flour used.

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