Chatelaine Kitchen

Kitchen Tip : An easy way to extract pomegranate seeds

Our associate food editor, Lyn, brought in a special treat for us this week – yellow pomegranates! We're all very familiar with the plump red variety with ruby red seeds, but this was the first time any of us had tried the yellow-skinned variety.

Roberto Caruso

Our associate food editor, Lyn, brought in a special treat for us this week – yellow pomegranates! We’re all very familiar with the plump red variety with ruby seeds, but this was the first time any of us had tried the yellow-skinned version. 

The Chatelaine Kitchen staff did a taste test and we were surprised to find that the yellow pomegranate is actually much sweeter than its red-skinned cousin. The flavour is mellow without the tartness the red pomegranate frequently exhibits, and the seeds are a pretty pink colour reminiscent of grapefruit. 

Although the yellow pomegranate isn’t widely available, you might just find them at your local market or ethnic grocer (Lyn saw them at St. Lawrence Market and at Sri Lankan ethnic shops in North Toronto).  If you’re lucky enough to find one, try it in substitution for the red fruit in your next recipe! We like to add them as a garnish to salads and cocktails, but also just love to snack on the seeds by themselves. As we all now know, pomegranates are loaded with antioxidants.

Pomegranate tip: To easily extract seeds from a pomegranate, cut the crown end of a pomegranate. With a knife, score skin from end to end in six places. Fill a large bowl with cold water. Holding fruit underwater, gently break into sections along lines. Massage to free the seeds. Seeds will sink while membranes will float to the top. Scoop membranes out. Strain seeds and pat dry. This will save your clothes and your walls from staining pomegranate splatters!

-Irene

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