Recipes

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When I cook dried legumes, they’re often still hard after hours of cooking. What’s the correct way to cook dried peas and beans?

Sometimes storage conditions are the cause of hard-to-cook beans. Beans stored at high temperatures or humidity—think of cupboards over the oven or under the sink—don’t soften when cooked. Make sure to store dried legumes in an airtight container in a cool place, around 40 F (4 C).

Before cooking, pre-soak dried beans or peas for at least six hours, preferably overnight. This saves cooking time and helps the bean keep its shape. Rinse and drain them before cooking.

Place drained beans in a large pot and cover with two inches (5 cm) of water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Skim off any surface foam. Reduce to low heat, then partially cover and simmer, stirring and skimming occasionally, until beans are tender. It’s best to simmer, as boiling ruptures the skins.

Seasonings are also important! Bay leaves, cloves, whole fresh herbs, chopped onions and carrots and ham or turkey bones add wonderful flavour. Stay away from adding salt or anything acidic, such as tomatoes, vinegar, citrus juice or molasses, until beans are nearly finished. Salt and acids slow cooking.

What is buttermilk? Is it unhealthy?

Traditionally, buttermilk was the liquid left over after cream had been churned into butter. Today, buttermilk is commercially made from skim milk and consists of mostly milk and bacterial culture. Some manufacturers even add flecks of butter to make it look authentic.

What is buttermilk? Is it unhealthy?

Traditionally, buttermilk was the liquid left over after cream had been churned into butter. Today, buttermilk is commercially made from skim milk and consists of mostly milk and bacterial culture. Some manufacturers even add flecks of butter to make it look authentic.

What is buttermilk? Is it unhealthy?

Traditionally, buttermilk was the liquid left over after cream had been churned into butter. Today, buttermilk is commercially made from skim milk and consists of mostly milk and bacterial culture. Some manufacturers even add flecks of butter to make it look authentic.