Living

Siblings make kids sad, Canadians killed in Cancun explosion, and time runs out for the Oprah bump

How was your childhood? Unhappy? Science says blame your brothers and sisters. A new British study has found that the more siblings, the unhappier the child. Only children, once thought to be lonely shut-ins, are apparently the happiest of the lot. Possible reasons for this surprising discovery may include family bullying, lack of personal space, parental fatigue and having to fight for a parent's attentions.

How was your childhood? Unhappy? Science says blame your brothers and sisters. A new British study has found that the more siblings, the unhappier the child. Only children, once thought to be lonely shut-ins, are apparently the happiest of the lot. Possible reasons for this surprising discovery may include family bullying, lack of personal space, parental fatigue and having to fight for a parent’s attentions. 

Five Canadians have reportedly been killed in an apparent natural gas explosion at a Mexican resort near Cancun. Mexican authorities report the Canadians were among seven people killed and 15 injured by the blast, which shook the Grand Princess Riviera at around 9:30 a.m. Sunday morning. A nine-year-old boy is among the Canadians killed. The explosion reportedly blew chunks of flooring through the roof and left a crater a metre deep in the lobby of the 676-room resort. Authorities are investigating the cause, but currently suspect a buildup of natural gas under the hotel. 

An openly gay 14-year-old student recently addressed his school board about the treatment of homosexual youth in his community. Graham Taylor of Howell, Michigan, spoke up to defend his teacher, who was disciplined by the school board for ejecting two students from class for making homophobic remarks. Listen to an incredibly eloquent 14-year-old speak up for his own basic human rights. 

We’re all for equality in the workplace, but not when it comes to heart attacks. Unfortunately, a new study has found that women with high stress jobs or who have little control over how to do them are up to 40 percent more likely to have a heart attack, stroke, or clogged arteries than those with lower stress positions and more control. 

Ever read a book, seen a movie, or bought a skin cream because you heard about it on Oprah? If you answered yes, you’ve contributed to the Oprah Effect. An article in this weekend’s New York Times discusses the end of Oprah’s incredible power to create instant fame by simply giving her approval to a person, place or thing. Oprah is credited with bringing numerous people and products into the mainstream, including Dr. Phil, interior designer Chris Madden and Spanx undergarments. Would-be recipients of the Oprah bump are now clamouring to get on the program before it wraps for good this December.