Living

Oprah's new network, freezing your ovaries, and kids are watching way too much T.V.

Though there'll be no more daily commune with the queen of talk once her show goes off the air at the end of this season, but you can bet we'll still be getting a healthy dose of Oprah in our lives, and she promises it will be "bitch"-free. Oprah's new network – aptly named the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) – will hit the airwaves this coming January 1. The queen herself took to the stage at Maria Shriver's Women's Conference in California and announced that her cable network will be "fun and entertaining without tearing people down and calling them bitches. Imagine that. Imagine." We are imagining it Oprah, and we can hardly wait.

Though there’ll be no more daily commune with the queen of talk once her show goes off the air at the end of this season, but you can bet we’ll still be getting a healthy dose of Oprah in our lives, and she promises it will be “bitch”-free. Oprah’s new network – aptly named the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) – will hit the airwaves this coming January 1. The queen herself took to the stage at Maria Shriver’s Women’s Conference in California and announced that her cable network will be “fun and entertaining without tearing people down and calling them bitches. Imagine that. Imagine.” We are imagining it Oprah, and we can hardly wait.  

An American fertility expert is suggesting that women who want to postpone motherhood should freeze part of an ovary or an entire ovary, rather than individual eggs. Dr. Sherman Silber says that storing part of an ovary when a woman is young could yield as many as 60,000 eggs later in life, when the tissue would re-grafted to the reproductive system. It’s preferable to single egg retrieval, he says, because only one procedure would need to be performed. So far, 23 babies have been born thanks to ovary or ovarian tissue transplants.   

The mother of a former Canadian soldier who took his own life after serving in Afghanistan is requesting a formal apology from the Department of National Defence. Sheila Fynes’ son Cpl. Stuart Langridge was diagnosed with severe depression and post-traumatic stress disorder after returning from a six month tour of Afghanistan in 2005, and eventually hung himself in a barracks in CFB Edmonton in 2008. Fynes is supported in her demands by several members of the NDP, and says it was a legal and bureaucratic nightmare after her son died to gain access to his records or even the suicide note he had addressed to his family.  

It’s just as we’ve long suspected: kids these days are watching way too much television. Researchers at the Seattle Children’s Institute at the University of Washington discovered that American children under the age of five watch an average of 4.1 hours of television today – two to three hours more than the healthy limit. Researchers say this excessive time in front of the tube may be because busy parents use the T.V. as a babysitter. Another theory is that parents are less comfortable with allowing their young children to play outside. 

A former Beatle has set the blogosphere afire! A letter from John Lennon to his launderer is currently on display at a museum in Britain, and it’s rather bewildering. Apparently his shirt came back a tad yellow, and he’s pretty sure Yoko Ono is not to blame.