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Helen Mirren is hot, skinny women make more cash, and Gap's new logo is confusing

It pains us to report this, but a recent study has found that skinny women make more money then heavier women. For men the inverse is true, with thin men make less than heavier men.

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It pains us to report this, but a recent study has found that skinny women make more money then heavier women. For men the inverse is true, with thin men make less than heavier men. What does this mean? That we now have a whole new glass ceiling to break through. Thanks a lot, science.

Helen Mirren and Russell Brand: together at last? OK, so Brand isn’t ditching his girl Katy Perry for an older lady just yet, but Brand will appear alongside the hottest 65-year-old in the universe in the upcoming remake of The Tempest. Joining Mirren and Brand in this Julie Taymor-directed visual feast are Alfred Molina, Chris Cooper, Alan Cumming, Djimon Hounsou and David Strathairn. If this just-released trailer is any indication, Mirren is still a babe and Shakespeare is still a dish served best with a classy British accent.

People are really confused about the Gap’s new logo, which was published on their website without the hullabaloo and fanfare that usually accompanies a major rebranding of this sort. The clothing company has replaced their iconic white on blue logo with a new black-text version that looks suspiciously like clip art. Marketing experts have bee extremely critical of the design, but don’t take their word for it: judge for yourself.

Forbes magazine has published its female “power list,” and has included the winners’ marital status and number of children – details excluded from the men’s version of the list. Hmm, does this mean that women like Michelle Obama, Oprah, Hillary Clinton and Indra Nooyi are being judged on their ability to wed and reproduce? Say it ain’t so.

Young adults with university educations are now more likely to be married than those without – a complete turnaround from longstanding trends. According to a new study from the Pew Research Centre, about 62 percent of American college-educated 30-year-olds are or were married, compared to 60 percent of those without a bachelor’s degree. The study also found that those with less education are more likely to get divorced.