Living

Clinton's still got it, KFC's cheeky co-ed ads, and hormone pills cause kidney stones

Bubba's still got it. At a recent rally in West Virginia, an elderly woman fainted in the middle of a speech by former president Bill Clinton. Clinton proved he's still a bit of a ladykiller when he quickly asserting that "she'll be fine," before joking that "believe me, at my age, rarely does a lady faint on me." The audience cheered as Clinton exclaimed "the doctor says she's ok!"

Bubba’s still got it. At a recent rally in West Virginia, an elderly woman fainted in the middle of a speech by former president Bill Clinton.  Clinton proved he’s still a bit of a ladykiller when he quickly asserting that “she’ll be fine,” before joking that “believe me, at my age, rarely does a lady faint on me.” The audience cheered as Clinton exclaimed “the doctor says she’s ok!”   

As if KFC’s new Double Down – two slices of fried chicken sandwiching cheese, bacon and mayonnaise – wasn’t abhorrent enough, now the fast foot giant is advertising their new calorie orgy on the butts of college co-eds. KFC is paying female students at several American colleges $500 a day to hand out KFC coupons to the sandwich’s target demographic – young men. The ladies are outfitted in red sweatpants with the words “double down” emblazoned across their derrieres. Demeaning double entendre? We think so.  

A new American study shows that hormone pills taken by women after menopause increase the risk of kidney stones. The study found that women taking certain hormones were 1.21 times more likely to develop kidney stones over a five year period. Estrogen pills have been previously linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, heart attacks and strokes.   

If you liked the warm, antique-drenched aesthetic of Wes Anderson films like The Royal Tannenbaums or Life Aquatic, you’ll love his new ad for Stella Artois. It’s a smorgasbord of stunning interior design with just a dash of cheeky whimsy thrown in for good measure.  

At 8 p.m last night, the 33 Chilean miners that have been trapped 600 metres underground since August 5 began their ascent to the surface. The miners are being transported one at a time in a small capsule that will travel through a narrow shaft that took weeks to drill.