Living

Clinton chills out, northern terrorists, and Amazon's guide to pedophilia

It seems the laid back, take-it-easy attitude of the land-down-under has gotten to Hillary Clinton. Clinton was interviewed by Aussie comedians Hamish and Andy on a recent visit to Australia and appeared uncharacteristically relaxed. The Secretary of State joked about bikinis and wrestling, and even graciously accepted a gift of gravy flavoured chips. Best exchange: Hamish: “Have you ever said the phrase 'You've just made a very powerful enemy?'” Clinton: “No, but I've thought it.”

It seems the laid back, take-it-easy attitude of the land-down-under has got to Hillary Clinton. Clinton was interviewed by Aussie comedians Hamish and Andy on a recent visit to Australia and appeared uncharacteristically relaxed. The Secretary of State joked about bikinis and wrestling, and even graciously accepted a gift of gravy-flavoured chips. Best exchange: Hamish: “Have you ever said the phrase ‘You’ve just made a very powerful enemy?’” Clinton: “No, but I’ve thought it.” 

You can get pretty much any book on Amazon, including, you’ll be be outraged to discover, The Pedophile’s Guide to Love and Pleasure. For only $4.79, happy readers will be shipped author Philip R. Greaves’ “Child-Lover Code of Conduct.” According to the book’s description, Greaves hopes to “make pedophile situations safer for those juveniles that find themselves involved in them, by establishing certian [sic] rules for these adults to follow. I hope to achieve this by appealing to the better nature of pedosexuals, with hope that their doing so will result in less hatred and perhaps liter [sic] sentences should they ever be caught.” Horrified? So are the hundreds of people who have already commented on the book’s Amazon page. So far the online retailer has defended its decision to sell the book, claiming to remove it would amount to censorship. 

How would your colleagues describe your workplace demeanor – caring and sensitive, or assertive and confident? If you’re a woman, you’ll likely hear sugary, supportive adjectives rather than ball-busting aggressive ones. That’s according to a new study that analyzed hundreds of college reference letters and found that women were usually described as caring and nurturing, while men were more likely to receive descriptors indicating confidence and aggressiveness. It also turns out that employers are more likely to hire individuals with reference letters describing assertive, hardcore, take-no-prisoners qualities. It’s true what they say: nice girls finish last. 

A recently declassified intelligence assessment highlights possible terror threats in Canada’s north. The report was obtained by the Canadian Press and revealed that ships with links to human smuggling, drug trafficking, and organized crime have attempted to access our Arctic territory in recent years. Some experts speculate that terrorists or extremist groups might capitalize on the region’s spotty surveillance to gain entry into North America. 

Two new studies indicate that limiting the number of hours bars are open and banning liquor sales one day a week may have a major impact on alcohol-related crime, injury and death. One study reviewed a paper that examined the murder rate in the Brazilian city of Diadema, which dropped by 41 percent when authorities forced bars to close at 11 p.m. instead of staying open all night. The second study found that banning alcohol sales one day a week meant fewer car crashes, cases of impaired driving, police interventions against drunk people, and assaults and domestic disturbances.