Living

Bristol brings down DWTS, a cholesterol miracle drug, and why Iran thinks we're the dangerous ones

If you've watched Bristol Palin swing her arms around like a pair of two-by-fours on DWTS and wondered how she keeps on winning, you're not alone. After Palin's surprise upset win over Brandy on Tuesday's results show, ABC revealed that Tea Party supporters have been exploiting a glitch in the network's online voting system.

 

If you’ve watched Bristol Palin swing her arms around like a pair of two-by-fours on DWTS and wondered how she keeps on winning, you’re not alone. After Palin’s surprise upset win over Brandy on Tuesday’s results show, ABC revealed that Tea Party supporters have been exploiting a glitch in the network’s online voting system. That problem has apparently been rectified, but now the show’s producers are saying that in lieu of recent events (namely, the massively under-talented Palin beating top scoring Brandy), they may change the way the voting system is weighted so that judges’ scores are worth more. No matter which way you slice it, democracy looses. 

This is rich: Iran’s foreign ministry is advising Iranian nationals against travelling to Canada due to our rampant Islamophobia, poor immigration record and high crime rates. Maclean’s magazine’s Michael Petrou gets it right with the following statement: “What commentary can one add to a story that’s beyond parody?” Enough said.

An experimental new drug that manages cholesterol levels is getting “spectacular” results, according to scientists. The drug is called anacetrapib, and recent studies indicate it can boost good cholesterol so high and drop bad cholesterol so low that it could potentially provide a new way of preventing heart attacks and strokes. It’s still a long way from hitting the market, though – at least several more years of research are needed to see if the drug is as miraculous as it currently appears to be. 

According to the results of a recent Pew survey, getting married is so last year. In fact four out of ten individuals surveyed said marriage is becoming obsolete. The survey also found that around 29 percent of children under the age of 18 live with a parent or parents who are no longer married or were never married in the first place. When asked what constitutes a family, nearly everyone agreed that a married heterosexual couple with or without children fits the bill. Three fifths of those surveyed also included same-sex couples with a child or children as a family. 

Cash for grades? Really? The Toronto District School Board has announced it is considering paying poor students to stay in school and get good grades. The TDSB’s education director Chris Spence proposed the idea on Sunday via Twitter, saying “Should we pay kids in our more disadvantaged communities to do well in school? Perhaps, as a part of a poverty reduction scheme?” The reaction of both the public and members of the TDSB has been mixed, with most agreeing that it’s far too simplistic a solution for an undeniably complicated problem.